How to Cope with Dissociative Disorder

How to Cope with Dissociative Disorder

By Meaghan Archer

Dissociation occurs between people and things. A person with dissociative disorder will distance themselves from friends, family and activities because of [“made” thoughts and feelings](http://www.isst-d.org/?contentID=76) they experience. These thoughts and feelings are not real—they are created in the person’s mind and have no factual or realistic basis. So how does one cope with this disorder?

  • Therapy

    By Meaghan Archer

    Therapy is one of the most common coping mechanisms for almost every mental illness, including dissociative disorder. When [looking for a therapist,](http://www.teenrehab.org/6-traits-of-great-counsellors/) you want to find someone you are comfortable with and can easily talk to and feel safe with. You will also want to find someone who will work with your individual needs and not just approach your situation from a general standpoint.

  • Boundaries

    By Meaghan Archer

    Dissociation can be the result of ([childhood](http://www.teenrehab.org/how-trauma-can-impact-a-child-later-in-life/)) trauma, so [boundaries may need to be set](http://www.teenrehab.org/how-to-overcome-childhood-trauma/) between you and another person, perhaps and abuser or even a place. You can set boundaries for yourself, acknowledging what your triggers are. However, it may be more beneficial to talk to the person with whom you need to set the boundary. If this is too difficult, you can always ask a loved one to mediate so you do not have to have direct contact.

  • Journalling

    By Meaghan Archer

    [Journalling](http://www.teenrehab.org/the-benefits-of-journalling/) is an easy and personal way to connect with your inner self and express your thoughts and feelings. Writing everything down can be a lot easier than trying to talk to someone, and getting everything down on paper helps to clear our minds and sort our thoughts. Plus, no one has to ever see what you’ve written—not even you.

  • Medication

    By Meaghan Archer

    There is no specific medication to treat dissociative disorders, however, antidepressants can be prescribed by your doctor if you are experiencing depression or anxiety in addition to the dissociation. Make an appointment with your doctor if to talk about the possibility of medication. However, know that it is not for everyone and it is up to your doctor’s discretion to prescribe something or not.

Feature Image: Gabriel Garcia Marengo