5 Things You Didn’t Know About Valium

08 Jun 5 Things You Didn’t Know About Valium

Valium is the brand for the drug diazepam and is prescribed by doctors to treat anxiety. Here are five things you may not know about this drug including why it is prescribed and how it might be abused.

1. Why is Valium prescribed?

Valium is prescribed to treat anxiety disorders. Teens may experience anxiety because of school pressure, social pressure, family struggles or other pre-existing mental health disorders. It can also be prescribed to treat frequent seizures or muscle spasms.

2. What does Valium do?

Valium slows down chemical processes in the brain that heighten nervousness and anxiety, replacing them with feelings of calmness and euphoria.

3. What are its possible side effects?

There are many possible side effects of valium use, including:

  • Memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Dizziness or blurred vision
  • Nausea
  • Troubles urinating or controlling bladder*
  • Shallow breathing*
  • Seizures*
  • Agitation or aggression*
  • Hallucinations*
  • Depression or suicidal thoughts*

*These symptoms are less common and you should call a medical professional if someone you know exhibits them.

4. How is Valium abused?

As Valium creates feelings of euphoria and calmness, users may begin abusing this drug if they have built up a tolerance to its effects and don’t want to feel the possible negative effects from stopping.

5. Where are teens obtaining Valium from?

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Image Jessica Lucia

Teens could be obtaining Valium through a prescription, or they could also be stealing the drug from family members, getting it from friends or purchasing it on the street. If you or your teen is using Valium, ensure that you are keeping track of the amount of medicine used from new bottles—this may help to inform you whether others are taking your medicine and using it improperly.

Valium is a drug of abuse, often because it produces euphoric and calming effects. Always be mindful of where you store your medication, and how accessible or inaccessible it is to those around you.

Featured image John Deane



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